Categories
Family Matters

Tips on How to Have a Cute Baby Pics

Taking your baby’s photos can be hard and miss. Here are some tips to help you get the perfect shot.

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1.PLAIN BACKGROUND

    This allows the baby to be the center of attraction.

    2. CAPTURE BABY’S DIFFERENT EMOTIONS

    Crying and yawning is often cute and memorable.

    3. PLAY  WITH LITTLE ANGELS

    In order to have a good shot, play with them. Give them toys applicable to their age and you will see the different expressions on their faces.  Sometimes getting down to their level is best needed.

    4. ALWAYS KEEP THE CAMERA READY

    Make sure that the camera is ready because you’ll never know when is the ideal  time to take a photo. If you keep on taking pictures you’ll eventually get a good one.

    5. CHANGE THE BACKGROUND EFFECTS

    Experiment on changing the backgrounds of the your best photos like black or white- just like grandma’s time.  You can change it through your computers at home.

    Categories
    Healthy mind

    Trouble with Teens

    Despite all the warnings, it can still be a big shock when little angels turn into moody adolescents

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    One minute you’re getting on, the next it’s war. But it’s vital to remember that parents are supposed to set rules and teenagers are meant to rebel against them. So what can you do to ensure you both survive these difficult years?


    REMAIN CONFIDENT IN YOURSELF

    When you’re told you know nothing, look ridiculous and are the worst parent in the world, it’s hard not to take it personally. Try to remind yourself your kids are just seeing you through adolescent eyes.

    REINFORCE POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR

    Teenagers often think everything they do is wrong. Praise and thank them when merited.

    GROUNDING DOESN’T WORK

    The older and bigger they get, the harder it is to stop them walking out the door. It’s more effective to0 stop doing everything for them. If they won’t help at home after you’ve asked them to, don’t do their washing. Stop driving them and doling out money.

    CHOOSE YOUR FIGHTS WISELY

    Be willing to compromise on trivial matters. Focus on safety. Letting a 14-year-old go to a party where there’s alcohol is not safe. Nor is letting them hang out in a park at night.

    PRESENT A UNITED FRONT

    Adolescents love to divide and conquer their parents. If they ask if they can go somewhere or have people over, say you’ll talk to the other parent and get back to them. It gives you time to work out a joint response.

    INSIST ON REGULAR FAMILY DINNERS

    During meals, discuss any domestic issues, reinforce values and set house rules. Consider suggestions and complaints objectively.

    TAKE SOME TIME OUT

    If a discussion gets too heated, end it. Try not to react too strongly to bad language and name-calling. Say you’ll need to talk about the issue when you’re both feeling calmer.

    IT’S ALL IN THE TIMING

    Don’t tackle teenagers as soon as they come home or leave. Address serious concerns on long drives or after watching a film together.

    TRY TO SET A GOOD EXAMPLE

    If you yell, swear or slam doors, it’ll be hard to insist your child doesn’t.

    ENCOURAGE INDEPENDENCE

    Our job is to set our kids up for life, teach them life skills and encourage them to form opinions and make decisions.

    Reference:

    New Idea Magazine

    Healthy Mind with The Morning Show Clinical Psychologist

    Jo Ramble

    p.72

    Categories
    Health

    Habits that can age you 12 years

    Four common bad habits combined — smoking, drinking too much, inactivity and poor diet — can age you by 12 years, sobering new research suggests.

    The findings are from a study that tracked nearly 5,000 British adults for 20 years, and they highlight yet another reason to adopt a healthier lifestyle.

    Overall, 314 people studied had all four unhealthy behaviors. Among them, 91 died during the study, or 29 percent. Among the 387 healthiest people with none of the four habits, only 32 died, or about 8 percent.

    The risky behaviors were: smoking tobacco; downing more than three alcoholic drinks per day for men and more than two daily for women; getting less than two hours of physical activity per week; and eating fruits and vegetables fewer than three times daily.

    These habits combined substantially increased the risk of death and made people who engaged in them seem 12 years older than people in the healthiest group, said lead researcher Elisabeth Kvaavik of the University of Oslo.

    The study appears in Monday’s Archives of Internal Medicine.

    The healthiest group included never-smokers and those who had quit; teetotalers, women who had fewer than two drinks daily and men who had fewer than three; those who got at least two hours of physical activity weekly; and those who ate fruits and vegetables at least three times daily.

    “You don’t need to be extreme” to be in the healthy category, Kvaavik said. “These behaviors add up, so together it’s quite good. It should be possible for most people to manage to do it.”

    For example, one carrot, one apple and a glass of orange juice would suffice for the fruit and vegetable cutoffs in the study, Kvaavik said, noting that the amounts are pretty modest and less strict than many guidelines.

    The U.S. government generally recommends at least 4 cups of fruits or vegetables daily for adults, depending on age and activity level; and about 2 1/2 hours of exercise weekly.

    Study participants were 4,886 British adults aged 18 and older, or 44 years old on average. They were randomly selected from participants in a separate nationwide British health survey. Study subjects were asked about various lifestyle habits only once, a potential limitation, but Kvaavik said those habits tend to be fairly stable in adulthood.

    Death certificates were checked for the next 20 years. The most common causes of death included heart disease and cancer, both related to unhealthy lifestyles.

    Kvaavik said her results are applicable to other westernized nations including the United States.

    June Stevens, a University of North Carolina public health researcher, said the results are in line with previous studies that examined the combined effects of health-related habits on longevity.

    The findings don’t mean that everyone who maintains a healthy lifestyle will live longer than those who don’t, but it will increase the odds, Stevens said.

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